Upon selecting a pre-configured docker environment and a computational machine, a Polly Notebook starts launching on a new tab of the browser. Based upon the type of computational machine chosen while launching a Polly Notebook you will see a progress bar which will tell you that your new notebook is opening.

Progress bar upon launching a Polly Notebook

Figure 10. Progress bar upon launching a Polly Notebook

Once the server is ready, you will see the new notebook gets opened on the browser. The interface is very similar to that of a Jupyter notebook.

Polly Notebook interface

Figure 11. Polly Notebook interface

On the top left, you can see a pre-defined name given to the notebook if in case a new notebook was created. Towards the top right, you can see the Polly Workspace name and below it, you can see the kernel/docker environment selected for opening the notebook.

  • Menu bar: There are multiple tabs present in the menu bar section which can be used to operate various functions in the notebook. For example, under the File tab, you can select the Rename option to change the name of the current active notebook.

  • Toolbar: It contains multiple icons that allow you to perform various operations that are frequently used.

Structure of Polly Notebook

The Polly notebook comprises of a sequence of cells. There are three types of cells: markdown cells, raw cells, and code cells. In each of these types, you can input multi-line content and each cell can be executed by pressing Shift+Enter, or by clicking either the Run cells option on Cell tab in the menu bar or the “Play” button in the toolbar.

Structure of a Polly Notebook

Figure 12. Structure of a Polly Notebook

Markdown cells

You can record the computational process in a proficient manner using rich text. The Markdown language allows you to define a structure to the notebook by using markdown headings. It gives a basic method to play out text markup, that is, to determine which parts of the text should be stressed (italics), bold, form lists, etc.

Raw cells

You can write output directly in the raw cells. A raw cell is not evaluated by a notebook meaning anything written in the raw cell goes to the output when that cell is executed.

Code cells

A code cell allows you to edit and write a new code. The code cell executes the code written by you based on the kernel selected while launching the notebook. The code cell can include multiple programming languages as well as seen on the bottom right side of the image above. The above example is of a Pollyglot Docker environment which allows you to select multiple programming languages in the same notebook thus, you can select the type of kernel you prefer to code on.

Once the code cell is executed, the results which are computed by sending the code to the kernel are displayed as an output below the cell. Again to execute a code cell, you can click on the “Run” button and if you want to stop the computation process of a particular code cell, then the “Interrupt” button needs to be selected in the toolbar.

Running a code cell

Figure 13. Running a code cell

Polly Offerings

Polly Offerings tab in the Menu bar contains the following two options, namely Terminal and File Explorer which are described below.

Polly Offerings tab

Figure 14. Polly Offerings tab

Terminal

Once the Terminal option is selected, it launches a new tab on the browser and provides access to the command-line interface to execute any sets of commands. You have access to all the file types which are available in the docker environment and those can be managed through the terminal as well. The terminal option also allows you to install Python or R packages (as described later), managing system binaries and system configurations, and helps you working with code repositories hosted on GitHub, Bitbucket, etc.

Terminal screen window

Figure 15. Terminal screen window

File Explorer

Similar to the above option, if you select the File Explorer option, a new tab opens up in the browser and you can view different file types and directories present in the docker environment. Under the Files tab, the list of all the files and directories is available to you and any modification such as delete, upload or modifying by opening a file type can be done.

Demo Data for FirstView

Figure 16. File Explorer window

Additionally, you can also launch a new notebook by selecting the New button present on the top right corner of the page in File Explorer. The new notebook will open in a new tab and would automatically be made available in the Notebook section of the same Polly Workspace of the original notebook.

Launching a new notebook using File Explorer

Figure 17. Launching a new notebook using File Explorer

File Explorer window also allows you to view, edit or create various file types in an interactive manner. The Text File option in the New button can be used to create a new text file. For viewing or editing a file, you can click on the file and a text editor will open in a new tab of the browser. You can view or edit the file and save the changes made in the file. The text editor also allows you to select a programming language from the Language tab to edit and convert the file format.

Opening a file using a Text editor

Figure 18. Opening a file using a Text editor

Accessing Workspace files in Notebook

Accessing individual files using Python and R functions

For carrying on analysis, if you require any input files which are available in Polly Workspaces, those files can be fetched using a set of commands. You can list all the files present in the Workspace and then select the individual file by the following command:

## Lists all the files present in the project
list_project_file()
## The file will be downloaded in the current working directory
download_project_file('sample_file.csv')

After finishing the analysis, you can push back the newly generated output files again to the Workspace using the following command

## Save the file to the project
save_file_to_project('sample_file.csv')

Accessing individual files in a notebook

Figure 19. Accessing individual files in a notebook

Note:

  • These functions cannot access files within folders in workspace. To access those files, use CLI commands.

Accessing files and directories using CLI commands

The contents of any directory within a Workspace can be listed using the following command on a notebook terminal or a bash cell.

polly files list --workspace-path "" -y

Here, the path of the directory has to start with “polly://”. To view the contents within a folder called “Data” in the workspace, the following command will have to be executed on the notebook terminal.

polly files list --workspace-path "polly://Data" -y

To access the directory in the notebook, the following command will have to be executed on the notebook terminal or a bash cell.

polly files sync -s "" -d "" -y

Here, -s refers to source and -d refers to destination. If the folder called “Data” is to be accessed from Workspace in the notebook folder called “Input”, execute the following command.

polly files sync -s "polly://Data" -d "Input" -y

To save notebook directories back to the Workspace, keep the source as notebook directory and destination as Polly Workspace in the same command as mentioned above.

polly files sync -s "" -d "" -y

To save the folder called “Output” back to Polly Workspace, use the following command.

polly files sync -s "Output" -d "polly://" -y

Similarly, if an individual file needs to be accessed in a notebook, use the following command

polly files copy -s "" -d "" -y

Here, -s refers to source and -d refers to destination. If the file called “Input1.csv” is to be accessed from Workspace folder “Data” in the notebook folder called “Input”, execute the following command.

polly files copy -s "polly://Data/Input1" -d "Input/Input1.csv" -y

An individual file can be saved back to workspace by interchanging source and destination in the mentioned command.

polly files copy -s "Input/Input1.csv" -d "polly://Data/Input1" -y

Installing Packages

Although most of the required packages and tools can be made available to you via the customized docker environment, sometimes you might require to install new packages to carry on the analysis. For installing the packages, you can choose two options based on their convenience, you can do it on the Notebook itself or via the terminal.

Installing packages and system binaries using the Notebook cell

You can install the required packages and system binaries by running the usual installation codes on the code cell of a notebook.

  • For Python packages: You can run the following command in the code cell with Python kernel selected to install the required packages.
# for installing packages DON'T forget to use sudo. It will not ask for password.
!sudo pip install 
  • For R packages: You can run the following command in the code cell with R kernel selected to install the required packages.
# for installing packages DON'T forget to use sudo. It will not ask for password.
## Installing CRAN packages
!sudo  R -e 'install.packages(c("package-name"), repos="https://cloud.r-project.org/")'

## Installing Bioconductor packages
!sudo R -e 'BiocManager::install(c("package-name"), update = TRUE, ask = FALSE)'
# If error finding BiocManager then install it first using the following command and re-run the above command.
!sudo  R -e 'install.packages(c("BiocManager"), repos="https://cloud.r-project.org/")'

Installing R and Python packages

Figure 20. Installing R and Python packages

  • For System binaries: You can also install the system binaries by running the following command in the code cell selecting the bash kernel.
# System binaries
sudo apt install 

# If the above command outputs package not found, You can run this command to update the system package indices
sudo apt-get update

Installing System binaries using the Notebook code cell

Figure 21. Installing System binaries using the Notebook code cell

Installing packages and system binaries via Terminal

Another option is also available to install various packages and system binaries using the terminal. You can access the terminal as described in the document above. The commands for installation are almost similar to commands used while installing using a notebook code cell.

  • For Python packages: You can run the following command directly on the terminal to install the required packages. Once the package installation is successful, you can import the package in your notebook.
# for installing packages DON'T forget to use sudo. It will not ask for password.
> sudo pip install 

Installing Python packages using the Terminal

Figure 22. Installing Python packages using the Terminal

  • For R packages: You are required to go to the terminal and open the R Kernel using “sudo R” and then install the required R packages. Once the package installation is successful, you can import the library in your notebook R kernel as usual.
## You can install R package by opening R terminal
> sudo R

## Install CRAN packages using the following command
> install.packages(c('pkg-name'), dependencies=TRUE, repos=)
# For cran mirror link: You can use either of your choice or this one : "https://cran.cnr.berkeley.edu/"

## Install Bioconductor packages using the following command
> BiocManager::install(c("pkg-name"), update = TRUE, ask = FALSE)
# If error finding BiocManager then install it first using the following command and re-run the above command.
> install.packages("BiocManager")

Installing R packages using the Terminal

Figure 23. Installing R packages using the Terminal

  • For System binaries: You can also install the system binaries by running the following command directly on the terminal itself.
# System binaries
> sudo apt install 

# If the above command outputs package not found, You can run this command to update the system package indices
> sudo apt-get update

Installing System libraries using the Terminal

Figure 24. Installing System libraries using the Terminal

Reusable Scripts

Polly Notebook also allows you to make use of the reusable scripts which are already made available to you in every notebook. The reusable scripts consist of the snippet codes which are required frequently to perform any analysis. The scripts can include data reading, normalization, visualization generic functions/codes and can be added to the notebook code cell with just a single click and executed as usual. The reusable scripts can be found on the left side as a collapsible dialogue box and you can choose the scripts at any time while performing the analysis.

Reusable scripts on Polly Notebook

Figure 25. Reusable scripts on Polly Notebook

On the right side, another collapsible dialogue box gets opened when you select any reusable script which provides information about the options and usage of that particular reusable script. You can also add your own reusable scripts on the Polly Notebook so as to make use of them in your repeated analysis and save time.

Options and Information of Reusable scripts

Figure 26. Options and Information of Reusable scripts

Google Slides Integration

Reports serve as the culmination of each analysis where all plots and insights generated are added in a way that is easy to understand and draw conclusions from when shared with collaborators or even used as a point of reference for something done earlier. Presence of reports for each analysis ordered sequentially promotes reproducibility across the laboratory or the organization and reduces the manual labor involved in knowledge transfer.

To ensure that you do not spend a lot of time downloading plots and arranging them in a pre-defined order with the insights generated each time for a study, we have integrated Polly with Google Slides.

Note:

  • The Google Slides integration is only available through Polly Notebooks as of now.

Using the Integration

To use this integration, click on the Polly Offerings tab after you have generated your plots of interest as highlighted below.

Polly offerings

Figure 27. Polly offerings

Click on Export Charts to GSlide as highlighted below.

Export charts to GSlide integration

Figure 28. Export charts to GSlides integration

To proceed, this integration will require access to your Google account. This is needed so as to store the slide deck mapped to an account of your choice. Select the account to provide access to and click on Allow.

Choose an account

Figure 29. Choose an account

Confirm access to Google account

Figure 30. Confirm access to Google account

You will see a loading screen while the charts are being sent to Google Slides. You will automatically be redirected to the specific slide deck created.

Loading screen

Figure 31. Loading screen

The slide deck created will be named the same as your Polly Notebook. Each chart will be added as an image to a new slide. You can specify themes, add insights as text, resize or crop charts as usual.

New slide deck created

Figure 32. New slide deck created

Charts are added as an image

Figure 33. Charts are added as an image

Each slide will contain one chart

Figure 34. Each slide will contain one chart

Note:

  • Any slide decks created using this integration can be accessed by logging into the authorized Google account and going to Google Slides here.

  • The slide decks can be shared with your collaborators individually or as a publicly accessible link with either view or edit access. For a detailed documentation on Google Slides click here.

  • The security and privacy of any such slide deck created is regulated through Google’s access control policies.

Revoke Access

To revoke the access for this integration, go to your account settings here and click on Security on the left panel. You will see the integration listed as gslideChartsIntegration under Third-party apps with account access. Click on the integration as highlighted below.

Third-party apps with account access list

Figure 35. Third-party apps with account access list

gslideChartsIntegration

Figure 36. gslideChartsIntegration

Click on Revoke Access.

Revoke access

Figure 37. Revoke access

Click on Ok.

Confirm revoke access

Figure 38. Confirm revoke access

This will revoke access and as a result you will not be able to use the integration. To use it again, you will have to allow access as mentioned here.

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